Edinburgh Iranian Festival Fashion Presentation in Collaboration with ALANGOO.com

Lauren Davis, ALANGOO.com

On February 7, the National Museum of Scotland transformed into a world of color, texture, music, dance, and art inspired by Iran and its people. The museum’s prestigious grand gallery, with its soft white walls, tiled floors, and floor to ceiling windows, was the perfect venue for the festival’s Persian Chic: Fashion Show. Fashion lovers, Persian culture enthusiasts, and opportunistic tourists alike dropped into the museum’s grand floor to get a glimpse of what Iranian clothing and jewelry designers have to offer.

The show went off without a hitch, each strut down the runway bringing onlookers deeper into the magical world of Persian fashion, culture and history. While each designer’s creations could not be more different, handmade and unique to each designer’s aesthetic; there was a common thread among all, an influence and admiration for their Persian history and culture.

Golshid Mola, the founder and director of ALANGOO.com introduced each designer with a short background about them, their inspirations, and the materials and techniques used.

First to take the runway was Zarir Design Group from Tehran, Iran. Zarir is known for being an expert technical design team. The founders Ghazal and Rana use various dyeing, printing and finishing techniques to get the perfect design on their handmade Iranian fabrics.

© ZARIR

© ZARIR

© ZARIR



Second to go was the U.K. based Diba Mehr. Diba is known for mixing old and new. She uses thoroughly modern printing techniques to produce garments with different Persian cultural and historical symbols and themes.

© Diba Mehr ALANGOO.com/Diba

© Diba Mehr ALANGOO.com/Diba

ALANGOO.com/Diba

ALANGOO.com/Diba




Followed by Kourosh Gharbi, the king of Termeh, from Dubai.

8ccadec381de65c005aa3a7bffda2dc1

© kourosh Fashion ALANGOO.com/KouroshFashion





Last were the designs of Naghmeh Kiumarsi. She is based in Tehran and is known for her brave use of color. For this collection Naghmeh was inspired by the 17th century Qajar fashion and her garments had historical references. Naghmeh’s pieces were styled with NazzGallery jewelry. Nazanin Alainia, the head designer of NazzGallery is based in Tehran and Toronto. All her Persian poetry statement  jewelry have a beautiful story to say.

© Naghmeh Kiumarsi

© Naghmeh Kiumarsi

© Naghmeh Kiumarsi






Jewelry sculpture Farish Alborzkouh, from Tehran,a student of master sculptor Parviz Tanavoli for twelve years, also showcased her exquisite “wearable sculptures” inspired by the Persian Zoorkhane, Iranian Peykan and vintage Iranian stamps along with Jessica Howarth, an Edinburgh based British designer whose pieces reflect Iran’s rich history and culture.

© Farish ALANGOO.com/Farish

© Farish ALANGOO.com/Farish

© Farish ALANGOO.com/Farish

© Farish ALANGOO.com/Farish






© Jessica Howarth

© Jessica Howarth

© Jessica Howarth



The show was very well received by around 500 attendees and The National Museum of Scotland selected a piece from each designer to be showcased in their permanent collection of Iranian clothing. To make it easier for all attendees of the fashion show and for the rest of the world to purchase and learn more about the fabrics, techniques and the designers, ALANGOO.com made all the items available online on its website simultaneously with the festival. The show was a nice accomplishment for any designer but even more so for the Iran based designers who would otherwise have limited ways to share their talent with the world. Another step closer to our goal at ALANGOO.com, with special thanks to Edinburgh Iranian Festival for their hard work and passion.

Visit our photo gallery slide show below including behind the scene photos to get a glimpse of what went down. Also for our Persian speaking readers, check out Manoto TV coverage here and Jadid online interview with Farnaz Mohsenpour, curator of the show and Golshid Mola of ALANGOO.com.

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